Uncategorized

Santa Claus archetype

What do Santa Claus, Saint Nicholas, and the Norse God Odin have in common? More than you might think.

Old Saint Nick
Old Saint Nick

Interesting histories of these figures:
Santa Claus
Saint Nicholas

and a passage from wikipedia about Norse God Odin:

In 1917 George Harley McKnight claimed that Santa Claus was largely based on Odin, merged with the Christian legend of Saint Nicholas of Myra. Most Christmas traditions in Germanic countries derive from celebrations of the pagan winter solstice holiday Yule as a result of the gradual merging of the two holidays.

Odin was recorded as leading a great Yule hunting party through the sky. Two books from Iceland, the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson, describe Odin as riding an eight-legged horse named Sleipnir that could leap great distances, giving rise to comparisons to Santa Claus’s reindeer. Further, Odin was referred to by many names in Skaldic poetry, some of which describe his appearance or functions; these include Síðgrani, Síðskeggr, Langbarðr, (all meaning “long beard”) and Jólnir (“Yule figure”).

According to Phyllis Siefker, children would place their boots, filled with carrots, straw, or sugar, near the chimney for Odin’s flying horse, Sleipnir, to eat. Odin would then reward those children for their kindness by replacing Sleipnir’s food with gifts or candy. This practice, she claims, survived in Germany, Belgium, and the Netherlands after the adoption of Christianity and became associated with Saint Nicholas as a result of the process of Christianization and can be still seen in the modern practice of the hanging of stockings at the chimney in some homes.

More history about the practice of hanging stockings by the fire comes from folklore & stories about Nicholas:

stockings by the fire
stockings by the fire

In his (Nicholas’) most famous exploit, a poor man had three daughters but could not afford a proper dowry for them. This meant that they would remain unmarried and probably, in absence of any other possible employment, would have to become prostitutes. Hearing of the poor man’s plight, Nicholas decided to help him, but being too modest to help the man in public (or to save the man the humiliation of accepting charity), he went to his house under the cover of night and threw three purses (one for each daughter) filled with gold coins through the window opening into the man’s house.

One version has him throwing one purse for three consecutive nights. Another has him throw the purses over a period of three years, each time the night before one of the daughters comes of age. Invariably, the third time the father lies in wait, trying to discover the identity of their benefactor. In one version the father confronts the saint, only to have Saint Nicholas say it is not him he should thank, but God alone. In another version, Nicholas learns of the poor man’s plan and drops the third bag down the chimney instead; a variant holds that the daughter had washed her stockings that evening and hung them over the embers to dry, and that the bag of gold fell into the stocking.

source: wikipedia on Saint Nicholas

Astrology

new moon in libra: initiation, activation and evolution

by divine harmony

the new moon at 1’08 libra is exact on tuesday september 23rd, 2014 at 11:14pm PDT. this new moon happens a day after the sun’s ingress into libra, the time of the fall equinox in the northern hemisphere and the spring equinox in the southern hemisphere. the equinoxes are the times of year when day and night are equal- and symbolically this is a time to find balance within the self and in our outer lives. libra is a sign of balance- so this equinox new moon can start a brand new chapter in our lives in regards to how we strike this balance, or it may highlight where things are out of balance first so that we can be clear on what it is we need to realign within and without 😉

it is interesting to note that the equinox is the day BEFORE the new moon- so the equinox chart itself shows a dark moon (balsamic moon). there is something about the coming season (fall for those in the north, spring for those in the south) that has a focus on endings, completion, release, renewal and regeneration. we are seeking balance in our lives, relationships and the world around us- yet it is not until we are able to truly end and complete an old way of doing and being that we can birth something new and find the true, masterful balance we seek in our lives. this is amplified by the fact that pluto also stations direct on the same day as the equinox- so the lord of the underworld and planet of transformation, death and rebirth is strongly configured as an old cycle and season makes it way out. pluto is the root rooter of the Universe- so when he is stationary it truly is time to clear out the inner and outer crap in our lives!

this new moon is a powerhouse new moon for many reasons- and i HIGHLY recommend cleansing, retreating and taking time to introspect and reflect in the days leading up to it. we are not only ending an old lunar cycle at the start of next week (september 22nd-23rd)- we are also ending a whole season. endings precede new beginnings, but if we are still stuck in the past with one foot in and one foot out- we will not be going anywhere new! and worst, we will be dragging the past into our future with us- which depending on what it is we are holding onto, could actually serve to slow our growth and evolution down.

the sabian symbol for this new moon is ‘the light of the sixth race transmuted to the seventh’….

Read more at: divineharmony.org/cosmic-insight-divine-harmony/divine-harmony-astrology-blog/new-moon-libra-initiation-activation-evolution/

Uncategorized

Santa Claus archetype

What do Santa Claus, Saint Nicholas, and the Norse God Odin have in common? More than you might think.

Old Saint Nick
Old Saint Nick

Interesting histories of these figures:
Santa Claus
Saint Nicholas

and a passage from wikipedia about Norse God Odin:

In 1917 George Harley McKnight claimed that Santa Claus was largely based on Odin, merged with the Christian legend of Saint Nicholas of Myra. Most Christmas traditions in Germanic countries derive from celebrations of the pagan winter solstice holiday Yule as a result of the gradual merging of the two holidays.

Odin was recorded as leading a great Yule hunting party through the sky. Two books from Iceland, the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson, describe Odin as riding an eight-legged horse named Sleipnir that could leap great distances, giving rise to comparisons to Santa Claus’s reindeer. Further, Odin was referred to by many names in Skaldic poetry, some of which describe his appearance or functions; these include Síðgrani, Síðskeggr, Langbarðr, (all meaning “long beard”) and Jólnir (“Yule figure”).

According to Phyllis Siefker, children would place their boots, filled with carrots, straw, or sugar, near the chimney for Odin’s flying horse, Sleipnir, to eat. Odin would then reward those children for their kindness by replacing Sleipnir’s food with gifts or candy. This practice, she claims, survived in Germany, Belgium, and the Netherlands after the adoption of Christianity and became associated with Saint Nicholas as a result of the process of Christianization and can be still seen in the modern practice of the hanging of stockings at the chimney in some homes.

More history about the practice of hanging stockings by the fire comes from folklore & stories about Nicholas:

stockings by the fire
stockings by the fire

In his (Nicholas’) most famous exploit, a poor man had three daughters but could not afford a proper dowry for them. This meant that they would remain unmarried and probably, in absence of any other possible employment, would have to become prostitutes. Hearing of the poor man’s plight, Nicholas decided to help him, but being too modest to help the man in public (or to save the man the humiliation of accepting charity), he went to his house under the cover of night and threw three purses (one for each daughter) filled with gold coins through the window opening into the man’s house.

One version has him throwing one purse for three consecutive nights. Another has him throw the purses over a period of three years, each time the night before one of the daughters comes of age. Invariably, the third time the father lies in wait, trying to discover the identity of their benefactor. In one version the father confronts the saint, only to have Saint Nicholas say it is not him he should thank, but God alone. In another version, Nicholas learns of the poor man’s plan and drops the third bag down the chimney instead; a variant holds that the daughter had washed her stockings that evening and hung them over the embers to dry, and that the bag of gold fell into the stocking.

source: wikipedia on Saint Nicholas

Uncategorized

Santa Claus archetype

What do Santa Claus, Saint Nicholas, and the Norse God Odin have in common? More than you might think.

Old Saint Nick
Old Saint Nick

Interesting histories of these figures:

Santa Claus
Saint Nicholas

and a passage from wikipedia about Norse God Odin:

In 1917 George Harley McKnight claimed that Santa Claus was largely based on Odin, merged with the Christian legend of Saint Nicholas of Myra. Most Christmas traditions in Germanic countries derive from celebrations of the pagan winter solstice holiday Yule as a result of the gradual merging of the two holidays.

Odin was recorded as leading a great Yule hunting party through the sky. Two books from Iceland, the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson, describe Odin as riding an eight-legged horse named Sleipnir that could leap great distances, giving rise to comparisons to Santa Claus’s reindeer. Further, Odin was referred to by many names in Skaldic poetry, some of which describe his appearance or functions; these include Síðgrani, Síðskeggr, Langbarðr, (all meaning “long beard”) and Jólnir (“Yule figure”).

According to Phyllis Siefker, children would place their boots, filled with carrots, straw, or sugar, near the chimney for Odin’s flying horse, Sleipnir, to eat. Odin would then reward those children for their kindness by replacing Sleipnir’s food with gifts or candy. This practice, she claims, survived in Germany, Belgium, and the Netherlands after the adoption of Christianity and became associated with Saint Nicholas as a result of the process of Christianization and can be still seen in the modern practice of the hanging of stockings at the chimney in some homes.

More history about the practice of hanging stockings by the fire comes from folklore & stories about Nicholas:

stockings by the fire
stockings by the fire

In his (Nicholas’) most famous exploit, a poor man had three daughters but could not afford a proper dowry for them. This meant that they would remain unmarried and probably, in absence of any other possible employment, would have to become prostitutes. Hearing of the poor man’s plight, Nicholas decided to help him, but being too modest to help the man in public (or to save the man the humiliation of accepting charity), he went to his house under the cover of night and threw three purses (one for each daughter) filled with gold coins through the window opening into the man’s house.

One version has him throwing one purse for three consecutive nights. Another has him throw the purses over a period of three years, each time the night before one of the daughters comes of age. Invariably, the third time the father lies in wait, trying to discover the identity of their benefactor. In one version the father confronts the saint, only to have Saint Nicholas say it is not him he should thank, but God alone. In another version, Nicholas learns of the poor man’s plan and drops the third bag down the chimney instead; a variant holds that the daughter had washed her stockings that evening and hung them over the embers to dry, and that the bag of gold fell into the stocking.

source: wikipedia on Saint Nicholas

Astrology, Uncategorized

Jupiter just above the moon tonight

That bright dot just above the moon tonight – that’s Jupiter.
Jupiter has some interesting mythology – both as the ‘King of the Gods’ in Roman and Greek traditions, and in astrological tradition is the one that brings abundance, goodwill, and amplifies things.

Some of the history on Jupiter from Wikipedia:

The planet Jupiter has been known since ancient times. It is visible to the naked eye in the night sky and can occasionally be seen in the daytime when the sun is low.[131] To the Babylonians, this object represented their god Marduk. They used the roughly 12-year orbit of this planet along the ecliptic to define the constellations of their zodiac.[23][132]

The Romans named it after Jupiter (LatinIuppiter, Iūpiter) (also called Jove), the principal god of Roman mythology, whose name comes from the Proto-Indo-Europeanvocative compound *Dyēu-pəter (nominative: *Dyēus-pətēr, meaning “O Father Sky-God”, or “O Father Day-God”).[133] In turn, Jupiter was the counterpart to the mythical Greek Zeus (Ζεύς), also referred to as Dias (Δίας), the planetary name of which is retained in modern Greek.[134]

The astronomical symbol for the planet, ♃, is a stylized representation of the god’s lightning bolt. The original Greek deity Zeus supplies the root zeno-, used to form some Jupiter-related words, such as zenographic.[135]

Jovian is the adjectival form of Jupiter. The older adjectival form jovial, employed by astrologers in the Middle Ages, has come to mean “happy” or “merry,” moods ascribed toJupiter’s astrological influence.[136]

The Chinese, Korean and Japanese referred to the planet as the wood starChinese: 木星; pinyinmùxīng, based on the Chinese Five Elements.[137] Chinese Taoism personified it as the Fu star. The Greeks called it Φαέθων, Phaethon, “blazing.” In Vedic Astrology, Hindu astrologers named the planet after Brihaspati, the religious teacher of the gods, and often called it “Guru“, which literally means the “Heavy One.”[138] In the English languageThursday is derived from “Thor’s day”, with Thor associated with the planet Jupiter in Germanic mythology.[139]

In the Central Asian-Turkic myths, Jupiter called as a “Erendiz/Erentüz”, which means “eren(?)+yultuz(star)”. There are many theories about meaning of “eren”. Also, these peoples calculated the orbit of Jupiter as 11 years and 300 days. They believed that some social and natural events connected to Erentüz’s movements on the sky.[140]

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Joseph Campbell on Mythology

Joseph Campbell“The energies that move the body are the energies that move the imagination. These energies, then, are the source of mythological imagery; in a mythological organization of symbols, the conflicts between the different organic impulses within the body are resolved and harmonized. You might say a mythology is a formula for the harmonization of the energies of life.”

Joseph Campbell, interviewed by Joan Marler, in The Yoga Journal, Nov./Dec. 1987