Astrology, Uncategorized

Jupiter just above the moon tonight

That bright dot just above the moon tonight – that’s Jupiter.
Jupiter has some interesting mythology – both as the ‘King of the Gods’ in Roman and Greek traditions, and in astrological tradition is the one that brings abundance, goodwill, and amplifies things.

Some of the history on Jupiter from Wikipedia:

The planet Jupiter has been known since ancient times. It is visible to the naked eye in the night sky and can occasionally be seen in the daytime when the sun is low.[131] To the Babylonians, this object represented their god Marduk. They used the roughly 12-year orbit of this planet along the ecliptic to define the constellations of their zodiac.[23][132]

The Romans named it after Jupiter (LatinIuppiter, Iūpiter) (also called Jove), the principal god of Roman mythology, whose name comes from the Proto-Indo-Europeanvocative compound *Dyēu-pəter (nominative: *Dyēus-pətēr, meaning “O Father Sky-God”, or “O Father Day-God”).[133] In turn, Jupiter was the counterpart to the mythical Greek Zeus (Ζεύς), also referred to as Dias (Δίας), the planetary name of which is retained in modern Greek.[134]

The astronomical symbol for the planet, ♃, is a stylized representation of the god’s lightning bolt. The original Greek deity Zeus supplies the root zeno-, used to form some Jupiter-related words, such as zenographic.[135]

Jovian is the adjectival form of Jupiter. The older adjectival form jovial, employed by astrologers in the Middle Ages, has come to mean “happy” or “merry,” moods ascribed toJupiter’s astrological influence.[136]

The Chinese, Korean and Japanese referred to the planet as the wood starChinese: 木星; pinyinmùxīng, based on the Chinese Five Elements.[137] Chinese Taoism personified it as the Fu star. The Greeks called it Φαέθων, Phaethon, “blazing.” In Vedic Astrology, Hindu astrologers named the planet after Brihaspati, the religious teacher of the gods, and often called it “Guru“, which literally means the “Heavy One.”[138] In the English languageThursday is derived from “Thor’s day”, with Thor associated with the planet Jupiter in Germanic mythology.[139]

In the Central Asian-Turkic myths, Jupiter called as a “Erendiz/Erentüz”, which means “eren(?)+yultuz(star)”. There are many theories about meaning of “eren”. Also, these peoples calculated the orbit of Jupiter as 11 years and 300 days. They believed that some social and natural events connected to Erentüz’s movements on the sky.[140]

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